Advanced Materials Interfaces

Advanced Materials Interfaces
اسم المؤلف
Ashutosh Tiwari, Hirak K. Patra and Xuemei Wang
التاريخ
14 يناير 2019
المشاهدات
التقييم
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Advanced Materials Interfaces
من سلسلة علم المواد المتقدمة
Advanced Material Series
Ashutosh Tiwari, Hirak K. Patra and Xuemei Wang
Contents
Preface xiii
Part 1 Interfaces Design, Fabrication, and Properties
1 Mixed Protein/Polymer Nanostructures at Interfaces 3
Aristeidis Papagiannopoulos and Stergios Pispas
1.1 Introduction 3
1.2 Neutral and Charged Macromolecules at Interfaces 4
1.3 Interfacial Experimental Methods 7
1.4 Interactions of Proteins with Polymer-Free Interfaces 9
1.5 Polymers and Proteins in Solution 11
1.6 Proteins at Polymer-Modifed Interfaces 14
1.6.1 Steric E?ects 15
1.6.2 Polyelectrolyte Multilayers: Electrostatic Nature
of Interactions 21
1.6.3 Counterion Release: Charge Anisotropy 23
1.7 Protein-Loaded Interfaces with Potential for Applications 26
1.8 Conclusions 30
References 30
2 Exploitation of Self-Assembly Phenomena in
Liquid-Crystalline Polymer Phases for Obtaining
Multifunctional Materials 37
M. Giamberini and G. Malucelli
2.1 Introduction 37
2.2 Amphiphilic Self-Assembled LCPs 41
2.3 Self-Assembled LCPs Trough External Stimuli 44
2.4 Supramolecular Self-Assembled LCPs 48
2.5 Self-Assembled LCPs Trough Surface E?ects 54
2.6 Conclusions and Perspectives 57
References 59vi Contents
3 Scanning Probe Microscopy of Functional Materials
Surfaces and Interfaces 63
Pankaj Sharma and Jan Seidel
3.1 Introduction 64
3.2 Scanning Probe Microscopy Approach 65
3.2.1 Piezoresponse Force Microscopy 68
3.2.1.1 Advanced Modes of PFM 73
3.2.1.2 Enhancing Temporal Resolution 76
3.2.2 Conductive-Atomic Force Microscopy 79
3.2.3 Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy 81
3.3 Functional Material Surfaces and Interfaces 85
3.3.1 Ferroelectric Tunnel Junctions 86
3.3.2 Ferroic Domain Walls and Structural-Phase
Boundaries 93
3.3.3 Complex-Oxide Tin Films and
Heterostructures 95
3.3.4 Photovoltaics 104
3.4 Conclusion and Outlook 111
References 114
4 AFM Approaches to the Study of PDMS-Au and
Carbon-Based Surfaces and Interfaces 127
Giorgio Saverio Senesi, Alessandro Massaro,
Angelo Galiano and Leonardo Pellicani
4.1 Introduction 127
4.2 AFM Characterization of Micro–Nano Surfaces and
Interfaces of Carbon-Based Materials and PDMS-Au
Nanocomposites 130
4.3 3D Image Processing: ImageJ Tools 136
4.4 Scanning Capacitance Microscopy, Kelvin Probe
Microscopy, and Electromagnetic Characterization 138
4.5 AFM Artifacts 141
4.6 Conclusions (General Guidelines for Material
Characterization by AFM) 143
Acknowledgments 146
References 146Contents vii
5 One-Dimensional Silica Nanostructures and Metal–Silica
Nanocomposites: Fabrication, Characterization,
and Applications 149
Francesco Rufno
5.1 Introduction: Te Weird World of Silica Nanowires
and Metal–Silica Composite Nanowires 150
5.2 Silica Nanowires: Fabrication Methodologies,
Properties, and Applications 155
5.2.1 Metal-Catalyzed Growth 158
5.2.2 Oxide-Assisted Growth 174
5.3 Metal NPs-Decorated Silica Nanowires: Fabrication
Methodologies, Properties, and Applications 177
5.4 Metal NPs Embedded in Silica Nanowires: Fabrication
Methodologies, Properties, and Applications 188
5.5 Conclusions: Open Points and Perspectives 197
References 197
6 Understanding the Basic Mechanisms Acting on Interfaces:
Concrete Elements, Materials and Techniques 205
Dimitra V. Achilllopoulou
6.1 Summary 205
6.2 Introduction 207
6.3 Existing Knowledge on Force Transfer Mechanisms on
Reinforced Concrete Interfaces 212
6.3.1 Concrete Interfaces 212
6.3.2 Reinforcement E?ect on Concrete Interfaces 217
6.3.3 Interfaces of Strengthened RC Structural Elements 224
6.4 International Standards 236
6.4.1 Fib Bulletin 2010 237
6.4.2 ACI 318-08 238
6.4.3 Greek Retroft Code (Gre. Co.) Attuned
to EN-1998/part 3 238
6.5 Conclusions 241
References 242
7 Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives (PSA) Based on Silicone 249
Adrian Krzysztof Antosik and Zbigniew Czech
7.1 Introduction 249
7.2 Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives 250
7.2.1 Goal of Cross-Linking 251viii Contents
7.3 Signifcant Properties of Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives 253
7.3.1 Tack (Initial Adhesion) 253
7.3.2 Peel Adhesion (Adhesion) 254
7.3.3 Shear Strength (Cohesion) 255
7.3.4 Shrinkage 255
7.4 Silicone PSAs 256
7.4.1 Properties 256
7.4.2 E?ect of Cross-LinkingAgent to the Basic
Properties Si–PSA 260
7.4.3 Application 267
7.5 Conclusion 272
References 273
Part 2 Functional Interfaces: Fundamentals
and Frontiers
8 Interfacing Gelatin with (Hydr)oxides and Metal
Nanoparticles: Design of Advanced Hybrid Materials
for Biomedical Engineering Applications 277
Nathalie Steunou
8.1 Introduction 278
8.2 Physical Gelation of Gelatin 279
8.3 Synthesis of Gelatin-Based Hybrid Nanoparticles and
Nanocomposites 282
8.3.1 Preparation of Hybrid Composites by
Gelifcation and Complex Coacervation 282
8.3.2 Processing of Gelatin-Based Hybrid Materials
into Monoliths, Films, Foams and Nanofbers 288
8.3.3 Synthesis of Hybrid and Core–Shell
Nanoparticles and Nano-Objects 290
8.4 Characterization of Gelatin-Based Hybrid
Nanoparticles and Nanocomposites 294
8.5 Mechanical Properties of Gelatin-Based Hybrid
Nanoparticles and Nanocomposites 296
8.6 Design of Gelatin-Based Hybrid Nanoparticles for
Drug Delivery 302
8.7 Design of Nanostructured Gelatin-Based Hybrid
Sca?olds for Tissue Engineering and Regeneration
Applications 310
8.8 Conclusions and Outlook 316
References 318Contents ix
9 Implantable Materials for Local Drug Delivery in Bone
Regeneration 325
P. D?az-Rodr?guez and M. Landin
9.1 Bone Morphology 325
9.2 Bone Fracture Healing Process 326
9.3 Current Materials for Bone Regeneration 327
9.3.1 Metals 329
9.3.2 Ceramics 330
9.3.2.1 Biodegradable Ceramics 330
9.3.2.2 Non-Absorbable Ceramics 332
9.3.3 Polymers 332
9.3.3.1 Natural Polymers 333
9.3.3.2 Synthetic Polymers 334
9.3.4 Composites 335
9.4 Terapeutic Molecules with Interest in Bone Regeneration 336
9.4.1 Antibiotics 337
9.4.2 Growth Factors 339
9.4.3 Bisphosphonates 340
9.4.4 Corticosteroids 341
9.4.5 Hormones 341
9.4.6 Antitumoral Drugs 341
9.4.7 Others 342
9.5 Mechanism for Loading Drugs into Implant
Materials and Release Kinetics 343
9.5.1 Unspecifc Adsorption 344
9.5.2 Physical Interactions 345
9.5.3 Physical Entrapment 348
9.5.4 Chemical Immobilization 350
9.6 In Vitro Drug Release Studies 350
9.6.1 Drug Release Kinetic Analysis 354
9.7 Translation to the Human Situation 355
9.8 Conclusions (Future Perspectives) 356
Acknowledgments 357
References 357
10 Interaction of Cells with Di?erent Micrometer
and Submicrometer Topographies 379
M.V. Tuttolomondo, P.N. Catalano, M.G. Bellino
and M.F. Desimone
10.1 Introduction 379
10.2 Synthesis of Substrates with Controlled Topography 380x Contents
10.3 Methods for Creating Micro- and Nanotopographical
Features 381
10.4 Litography 381
10.4.1 Photolithography 381
10.4.2 Electron-Beam Lithography 382
10.4.3 Nanoimprint Lithography 383
10.4.4 Sof Lithography 384
10.5 Polymer Demixing 384
10.6 Self-Assembly 385
10.7 Cell Material Interactions 386
10.7.1 Lithography Method 386
10.7.2 Polymer Demixed 390
10.7.3 Cell Behaviour onto EISA obtained flms 390
10.7.4 Biological Evidence 395
10.8 Conclusions 397
Acknowledgements 399
References 399
11 Nanomaterial—Live Cell Interface: Mechanism
and Concern 405
Arka Mukhopadhyay and Hirak K. Patra
11.1 Introduction 405
11.2 Protein Destabilization 407
11.3 Nanomaterials-Induced Oxidative Stress 408
11.3.1 Transitional Metal–Oxide Nanomaterials
and ROS 409
11.3.2 Prooxidant E?ects of Metal Oxide
Nanoparticles 409
11.3.3 CNT-Induced ROS Formation 412
11.3.3.1 CNT-Induced In?ammation and
Genotoxicity and ROS 415
11.4 Nucleic Acid Damage 415
11.5 Damage to Membrane Integrity and Energy
Transduction 418
11.6 Conclusions 418
References 419Contents xi
12 Bioresponsive Surfaces and Interfaces Fabricated
by Innovative Laser Approaches 427
F. Sima, E. Axente, C. Ristoscu, O. Gallet, K. Anselme and
I.N. Mihailescu
12.1 Introduction 428
12.2 Pulsed Laser Methods Applied for the Grown of
Inorganic and Organic Coatings 430
12.3 Combinatorial Laser Approaches: New Tool for the
Fabrication of Compositional Libraries of Hybrid
Coatings 434
12.4 Tin Bioresponsive Coatings Synthesized by Lasers 437
12.4.1 Bioactive Inorganic Coatings Obtained
by PLD 438
12.4.2 Bioactive Organic Coatings Obtained
by MAPLE 439
12.4.3 Bioactive Inorganic–Organic Coatings
Obtained by Pulsed Laser Techniques 440
12.4.4 Combinatorial Tin Coatings Libraries
Synthesized by C-MAPLE 442
12.4.4.1 Tailoring Cell Signaling Response by
Compositional Gradient Bioactive
Coatings 442
12.4.4.2 Coatings for Protein Immobilization
and Controlled Release 448
12.5 Conclusion and Perspectives 452
Acknowledgments 453
References 453
13 Polymeric and Non-Polymeric Platforms for Cell Sheet
Detachment 463
Ana Civantos, Enrique Martinez-Campos, Maria E. Nash,
Alberto Gallardo, Viviana Ramos and Inmaculada Aranaz
13.1 Introduction 463
13.2 Te Extracellular Matrix 465
13.3 Platforms for Cell Detachment 466
13.3.1 Electroresponsive Platforms 466
13.3.1.1 Electroactive Self-Assembled
Monolayers 466
13.3.1.2 Polyelectrolyte-Modifed Surfaces 46913.3.2 Light-Induced Detachment 469
13.3.2.1 Photosensitive Inorganic-Based
Surfaces 469
13.3.2.2 Photosensitive Organic-Based
Surfaces 471
13.3.3 pH-Sensitive Surfaces 473
13.4 Degradable Platforms 475
13.4.1 Other Detaching Systems 476
13.4.2 Mechanical Platforms 476
13.4.3 Magnetic Platforms 479
13.4.4 Termoresponsive Platforms 480
13.4.5 Clinical Translation 485
13.5 Conclusions 487
References 487
Index 49
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